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Veivers House

History

The Veivers family posed in c.1900 outside Talgai; (back from left) Margaret, John, Marion and Grace; (front from left) Walter, Norman and Helen.

The Veivers family were responsible for much of the area's early development and the establishment of the Mudgeeraba township. The name Veivers has also become well-known throughout Queensland.

The name Veivers has become well-known throughout Queensland, in particular the southeast in recent times, for the contribution to sport and politics of second cousins, Tom and Mick Veivers. Both represented Australia, Tom in Cricket and Mick in Rugby League. What is not so widely known is the role their ancestors played in the building of our district and state.

In 1859, six members of the Veivers family, including brothers David (1837-1910), Robert (1832-1871) and John (1839-1904), emigrated to Brisbane from Scotland aboard the "Glentanner". The Veivers brothers were following in the footsteps of their uncle, Walter Hill, a famous botanist, who, amongst other great deeds, is responsible for introducing the mango and growing the first commercial macadamia crop in the world.

On the advice of their uncle, they took on logging in the vast cedar forests to the south of Brisbane, choosing to base their operations in a mustering hut on the banks of the river at Nerang. This hut was a part of the great Beau Desert cattle station. The brothers were all to marry and soon the Veivers name was well known among many areas including Cedar Creek, Coomera, Logan Village, Beenleigh and Tamborine. In 1875, David was to purchase two acres of land in Southport, for £24 – now valued at around $40 Million!

Robert acquired large tracts of land on the south bank of the Nerang River, opposite the site of the present day Nerang township. His daughter, Grace, born in 1862, was to be the first white child born between Nerang and Murwillumbah. Later, Grace was to marry Isaac Andrew, of Andrews House fame! They selected 1300 acres of fine grazing land at Mudgeeraba and built their house, "Somerset" in 1886. They were to be responsible for much of the area's early development and the establishment of the Mudgeeraba township.

Tabitha Millington (Year 11 1987) was responsible for designing the House logo. She wanted a bold and simplistic design using symbols that were already a part of Somerset College - the Moreton Bay Fig and the Seagull. The seagull in flight is bigger than the tree as it is striving for success, not necessarily winning. The tree represents the idea that Veivers House is a part of Somerset College. She deliberately chose not to include the full name Veivers as part of the design as it would have been too cluttered, so the large V is carried aloft by the seagull.